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Lizalin Rout

What crazy pastimes did people indulge in long ago?

December 06, 2019 10:32 AM

Due to illnesses and high mortality rate, the intimacy with death was connected to the growth in mourning culture in Victorian England.

It began with Queen Victoria wearing black for the rest of her life following the death of her husband Prince Albert.

This led to loved ones’ carrying locks of hair, and having the hair made into jewelry.

Post-mortem photography came next.

Victorians would take their dead, place them on a stand or have them sat in a posing position and take professional pictures. The stands helped corpses look alive, and allowed them to pose with their still-breathing family members.

bikash mahapatra

My ex wife worked for a company (a famous international confectionary company). She was casual and was authorised to work 20 hours a week. They paid her above award wages - more than they had to pay her. In return they gave her 30 hours worth of work to do in those 20 hours. When she said that she couldn’t complete the 30 hours work in 20 hours they argued that she should put in a bit extra because they were paying above the award wages. She said that if it took her 320 hours could she claim 30 hours wages. They said no as she was only authorised to work 20 hours. So, basically, they expected her to work for 30 hours for 20 hours pay. Lets say they paid 10% above the award rate but then wanted her to work 50% over the nominal hours which meant that they were underpaying her. She was told if she didn’t finish the 30 hours work for 20 hours pay they would find someone else who was willing to do it. This is illegal in Australia. The problem is that the award is a south Australian award and the company was incorporated in Victoria. In order to take the company to court it had to be done in Victoria because that is where the company was incorporated but she didn’t work in Victoria so the Victorian court couldn’t act. The company KNEW that what they were doing was illegal but didn’t care because they ALSO knew that the only thing she could do about it was quit (which she did). Sometimes the law protects the guilty.

December 06, 2019 13:14 PM
bikash mahapatra

You ask, “I have two employees who usually leave work at 6 p.m. every day. They are good employees, but I don't like that their commitment lasts only for working hours. What should I do as boss?” The main message here is you need to address your feelings on the matter before anything else. Please take the time to read this whole thing before blowing it off. Wow…. You do not have to like it. You exchange money for services. That is the employment contract. You say they are good employees. Therefore I assume they fulfill their end of that contract. You need to get over it and simply fulfill your end of the agreement. Simple. Remember, there is no crying in baseball. It's business not personal. Just like what an employer would say to someone they let go. Hourly employees are paid for their time. You don't pay. They don't work. Salaried employees are, in theory and depending on the job, paid for results. If they get the results in 4 hours a day. Guess what, they are leaving at noon everyday. If it takes them 12 hours, they either need to change what they are doing, too much work is on their plate, or they are not right for the position. But start from the position of too much on their plate. Analyze from that starting point. Some situations are that they signed up to work that many hours. Usually due to a reward. Like an ownership stake, large bonuses, advancement, etc… but something they want. Compensation. It is to their benefit to do so. And no, keeping your job is not a benefit. That is not a net gain. That is status quo. The dislike in this situation is often it is one of two things. But even if it is something else, in the end, it is your problem. Perception, expectation, etc. Your thoughts are not aligning with reality. So adjust yourself. 1- You are the owner of the company and have committed yourself 100% and you want everyone around you to commit at the same level. From their perspective, why should they? Do they get the “payout” at the end? Fame, Fortune? It makes no sense for them to commit at the level an owner would without a solid benefit to them. They do not have an emotional attachment to the company at that level. It should not be expected. Their priorities are different than yours. That is a good thing. 2 - Your a hard charging Manager that wants to make things happen. You put in the hours. You go the extra mile. You have tremendous pride in a job well done. And basically do not like that they are not like you. Be grateful they are not like you. That makes a well rounded team. You do you. Let them do them. The team is stronger for it. In any scenario, just be the best leader you can possibly be. Start by addressing the “feelings” you are experiencing. They will start affecting your day to day interactions. They will quit. They will quit YOU! Not the job. You will have failed them and your company in that scenario. Be a leader and inspire them. Nurture their skills and them as people. Appreciate what they contribute and show that appreciation to them often in ways they appreciate it. At the same time, be open with the opposite. Keep negative feedback constructive. Make sure it is not subjective. If you feel their is something bad that needs to be corrected stop yourself. Perception versus reality. Check yourself and make sure it is a real issue and not your feelings. I mention that so you do not think I am saying you need to kiss their butts. It is your company or you are responsible for it. But others need to exist there too. Balance. Reward good. Correct bad. If possible, give them a reason to be more committed if that is needed. Develop them, help them grow. But first, address your dislike of the situation. Use this as an opportunity for personal growth for yourself. Also an opportunity to create a better company or department culture. And I am not one of those, culture is everything fad types of people. It is important. But a small part of the mix. So, in summary. Correct yourself and your assumptions/feelings. Give them reasons not words to become more committed if you need that. Things they'll appreciate. Things that will.motivate them personally. It is not always money. Tie it to performance. Use the opportunity to improve the company, yourself, and the employees.

December 06, 2019 13:15 PM
bikash mahapatra

I feel like I might have a slightly different perspective than some (most) of the other respondents.  I AM that person that continually comes in up to 30 minutes late.  Not the one from this question.

I know that it is a problem that I have.  i know what causes the issue.  I am continually working on it and I have gotten MUCH better.  I used to be the guy that continually came in 30-240 minutes late.

My problem is that I don't handle state changes well.  And I feel like this trait is what makes me good at what I do.  Once I get into something I have a hard time walking away from it until it is done.  I will stay late regularly by an amount greater than twice my morning tardiness.  I don't report the extra time.  I just do it to finish what I am working on.

I have learned I can't watch tv shows before I am supposed to leave for work because I always have to leave at a mid point of the show and I have a hard time doing that.  I can't do work because I will start it and completely lose perception of time.  I have done that and completely missed half a day in the office because I was actually working from home.

I understand it can be a problem.  I have found the best solution is for my "official" start time to be 30 minutes before my "actual" start time.  So even though I am supposed to be in the office at 8:30 we know that I won't be there most days by 8:30 but I WILL be there by 9 when everyone else expects me.  And I have no problem putting in my time from when I get into the office.

I hope maybe the perspective from the other side helps you out.  I understand that this isn't a huge issue but something that you are trying to deal with and running out of ideas.

December 06, 2019 13:16 PM
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My ex wife worked for a company (a famous international confectionary company).

She was casual and was authorised to work 20 hours a week.

They paid her above award wages – more than they had to pay her.

In return they gave her 30 hours worth of work to do in those 20 hours.

When she said that she couldn’t complete the 30 hours work in 20 hours they argued that she should put in a bit extra because they were paying above the award wages.

She said that if it took her 320 hours could she claim 30 hours wages. They said no as she was only authorised to work 20 hours.

So, basically, they expected her to work for 30 hours for 20 hours pay. Lets say they paid 10% above the award rate but then wanted her to work 50% over the nominal hours which meant that they were underpaying her.

She was told if she didn’t finish the 30 hours work for 20 hours pay they would find someone else who was willing to do it.

This is illegal in Australia. The problem is that the award is a south Australian award and the company was incorporated in Victoria. In order to take the company to court it had to be done in Victoria because that is where the company was incorporated but she didn’t work in Victoria so the Victorian court couldn’t act. The company KNEW that what they were doing was illegal but didn’t care because they ALSO knew that the only thing she could do about it was quit (which she did).

Sometimes the law protects the guilty.

  • You must to post comments
0
0

You ask, “I have two employees who usually leave work at 6 p.m. every day. They are good employees, but I don’t like that their commitment lasts only for working hours. What should I do as boss?”

The main message here is you need to address your feelings on the matter before anything else. Please take the time to read this whole thing before blowing it off.

Wow…. You do not have to like it. You exchange money for services. That is the employment contract. You say they are good employees. Therefore I assume they fulfill their end of that contract. You need to get over it and simply fulfill your end of the agreement. Simple.

Remember, there is no crying in baseball. It’s business not personal. Just like what an employer would say to someone they let go.

Hourly employees are paid for their time. You don’t pay. They don’t work.

Salaried employees are, in theory and depending on the job, paid for results. If they get the results in 4 hours a day. Guess what, they are leaving at noon everyday. If it takes them 12 hours, they either need to change what they are doing, too much work is on their plate, or they are not right for the position. But start from the position of too much on their plate. Analyze from that starting point.

Some situations are that they signed up to work that many hours. Usually due to a reward. Like an ownership stake, large bonuses, advancement, etc… but something they want. Compensation. It is to their benefit to do so. And no, keeping your job is not a benefit. That is not a net gain. That is status quo.

The dislike in this situation is often it is one of two things. But even if it is something else, in the end, it is your problem. Perception, expectation, etc. Your thoughts are not aligning with reality. So adjust yourself.

1- You are the owner of the company and have committed yourself 100% and you want everyone around you to commit at the same level. From their perspective, why should they? Do they get the “payout” at the end? Fame, Fortune? It makes no sense for them to commit at the level an owner would without a solid benefit to them. They do not have an emotional attachment to the company at that level. It should not be expected. Their priorities are different than yours. That is a good thing.

2 – Your a hard charging Manager that wants to make things happen. You put in the hours. You go the extra mile. You have tremendous pride in a job well done. And basically do not like that they are not like you. Be grateful they are not like you. That makes a well rounded team. You do you. Let them do them. The team is stronger for it.

In any scenario, just be the best leader you can possibly be. Start by addressing the “feelings” you are experiencing. They will start affecting your day to day interactions. They will quit. They will quit YOU! Not the job. You will have failed them and your company in that scenario.

Be a leader and inspire them. Nurture their skills and them as people. Appreciate what they contribute and show that appreciation to them often in ways they appreciate it. At the same time, be open with the opposite. Keep negative feedback constructive. Make sure it is not subjective. If you feel their is something bad that needs to be corrected stop yourself. Perception versus reality. Check yourself and make sure it is a real issue and not your feelings. I mention that so you do not think I am saying you need to kiss their butts. It is your company or you are responsible for it. But others need to exist there too. Balance. Reward good. Correct bad.

If possible, give them a reason to be more committed if that is needed. Develop them, help them grow.

But first, address your dislike of the situation.

Use this as an opportunity for personal growth for yourself. Also an opportunity to create a better company or department culture. And I am not one of those, culture is everything fad types of people. It is important. But a small part of the mix.

So, in summary. Correct yourself and your assumptions/feelings. Give them reasons not words to become more committed if you need that. Things they’ll appreciate. Things that will.motivate them personally. It is not always money. Tie it to performance. Use the opportunity to improve the company, yourself, and the employees.

  • You must to post comments
0
0
I feel like I might have a slightly different perspective than some (most) of the other respondents.  I AM that person that continually comes in up to 30 minutes late.  Not the one from this question.

I know that it is a problem that I have.  i know what causes the issue.  I am continually working on it and I have gotten MUCH better.  I used to be the guy that continually came in 30-240 minutes late.

My problem is that I don’t handle state changes well.  And I feel like this trait is what makes me good at what I do.  Once I get into something I have a hard time walking away from it until it is done.  I will stay late regularly by an amount greater than twice my morning tardiness.  I don’t report the extra time.  I just do it to finish what I am working on.

I have learned I can’t watch tv shows before I am supposed to leave for work because I always have to leave at a mid point of the show and I have a hard time doing that.  I can’t do work because I will start it and completely lose perception of time.  I have done that and completely missed half a day in the office because I was actually working from home.

I understand it can be a problem.  I have found the best solution is for my “official” start time to be 30 minutes before my “actual” start time.  So even though I am supposed to be in the office at 8:30 we know that I won’t be there most days by 8:30 but I WILL be there by 9 when everyone else expects me.  And I have no problem putting in my time from when I get into the office.

I hope maybe the perspective from the other side helps you out.  I understand that this isn’t a huge issue but something that you are trying to deal with and running out of ideas.

  • You must to post comments
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